Aikido that Works

I have recently seen people referring to aikido styles as ‘Aikido that Works’, and that really made me stop and think.

Is it the style of aikido that works or is it the execution by the practitioner that works?
I am sure that a lousy effort by a student of a ‘strong’ style will be ineffective, just as the strong execution of a ‘soft’ style technique may be devastating. I have both seen and experienced these situations many times.

I have seen, though, examples of the bullshit aikido that looks totally staged, lame ass and sometimes downright embarrassing. This is what gives aikido a bad name and certainly needs to be buried somewhere with a bucket of lime.

Putting these ‘side show’ efforts aside though and looking at the more serious schools there is still scope for comparison and consideration of the differences. I have been looking at videos held as good examples of ‘Aikido that Works’ and liking what I see, however I do also see techniques executed the same way as I have been shown, taught and practiced in my own training and development and my mind recalls the dynamic executions of Miyamoto Shihan and Yokota Shihan, both of Hombu Shinjuku, as examples of a direct, dynamic and very effective form of delivery.

This is in direct contrast to other shihan that I have trained with, like Ichihashi (RIP) and Masuda, who’s rounded and relaxed styles do tend to look somewhat ineffective. That is until you happen to come to grips with these guys and be on the receiving end. The power is awe inspiring and it is like trying to move a tree.

So, I think that the answer to developing an effective aikido, and making it work, is to take in all that you see and learn then develop the techniques that suit your personal abilities best. Practice hard and make the techniques your own. In fact, own them.

It does not matter how good, powerful or proficient your instructor may be, you need to make the effort to hone your techniques into the effective dynamic yourself.

~ Denton

[Related post – Making it Matter]

Photo – Seki Shihan teaching at Auckland gasshuku 2006.