Dojo Files ~ The Other Dynamic

I see discussions on-line regarding comparisons between Aikido, Karate, BJJ, Taekwando and MMA — but one of these things is not the same, and that is Aikido.

Aikido is not a martial art.
(Excuse me while I remove the arrows from my back.)

Aikido is Budo and shares the Bushido ethos. The related martial art is aikijutsu, often also referred to as akibujutsu and these are fighting styles.

O Sensei developed his Aikibudo out of Aikijutsu and Jujutsu as a spiritual method of training the mind and developing a focused centre. His intention was that Aikido should be a method of spiritual development with the personal self defence component as a side benefit. Aikido was never intended as a fighting, or combat, form but more as a means to develop personal confidence and the ability to avoid confrontation, yet also have the skills to fend off an aggressive attacker. The attacker envisioned here being some random street thug and not a trained specialist fighter.

The key is ‘do’ meaning way or path in contrast to ‘jutsu’ (jitsu) meaning art, or mystical skills. Hence you have judo as the sport variation of jujutsu and kendo as the sport variation of kenjutsu. The development of the ‘do’ styles was for the purpose of zen practice and not as fighting styles or bujutsu.

To my way of thinking, Budo is the way of warfare, tactics and strategy and is the domain of the warrior monks and samurai, whereas bujutsu is the art of war, fighting and soldier craft.

So, although there is a definite bujutsu component in the taijutsu routines in aikido training it is only half the story. The development of ki and attitude form a large part of the skill development through the practice of ‘breath throws’ (kokyu-nage and zagi kokyu-ho) plus the sweeping dance-like movement of the basic throwing techniques.
These are meant for the development of poise, balance, control and follow through, and those are the main components that make the bujutsu versions of the techniques actually work.

During the later years at my dojo in Greerton as membership grew and senior students became more advanced I introduced back to back classes two evenings each week. The first was a general and beginner’s class where the slower flowing forms were practiced, then this was followed by a senior class of faster, harder and more dynamic technique execution. Jo-dori, tanto-dori, jiyu waza, etc.

There was no warm up at the second class: the first class was the warm up. For a senior to attend the second class they had to also attend the first.
So, in consideration of this I offer that aikido is in fact a warm up for aikijutsu.

This is really putting it in a nutshell and you really need to think harder about this to gain the complete picture.

~ Denton

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